DAISYKNITS
   Columbia Heights, MN 55421
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BROTHER MACHINE KNITTING BASICS

Following are some things that may help you as you begin machine knitting. Here is a list of what is here.  Carriage and its buttons, Upper Tension Unit, Some basic cast ons, Hanging a hem, Some types of hems, Some basic bind offs, How to knit a swatch for the standard and the bulky. If you have any questions please contact me. Print these off if you like and use them for your own personal use. Please do not make copies and hand them out.

CARRIAGE Some of the things you should know about the carriage and the function of its buttons.

v Tuck Buttons

  • When pushed in, the tuck buttons loop over, but do not knit those needles that are in the "B" position on the needle bed. Any other in work needles (those in D or E) will be knit in stockingnette (plain) stitches.
  • There are two tuck buttons. They are directional. If the left one is pushed in then the carriage will loop over any needles in the B position when the carriage is moved from right to left. If the right one is pushed in then the carriage will loop over any needles in the B position when the carriage is moved from left to right.
  • Rule: When the tuck buttons are pushed in there must not be 2 or more needles, in the "B" position, that are next to each other. There must be at least one needle in either the D or the E position on each side of the B position needle if you intend on knitting more than one row.
  • v MC Button

  • This button is used to knit 2 color fairilse patterns. When the MC button is pushed in the carriage knits those needles in the B position on the bed with the yarn that is in feeder "A" of the carriage AND knits those needles in the D or E position on the bed with the yarn that is in feeder "B" of the carriage.
  • When the MC button is pushed in and there are needles in B position and D or E position on the bed of the knitting machine, you must have yarn in both the 'A' and 'B' feeder of the carriage or you will drop stitches.
  • v L Button

  • The L button is used for thread lace patterns and is not available on all of the machines.
  • When in use the L button causes the carriage to knit only those needles in the B position with the yarn that is in feeder "A" while at the same time knitting all of the in work needles (B, D and E position) with the yarn that is in feeder B.
  • Therefore some of the needles on the bed will be knit with both yarns at the same time and some of the needles will knit with only one of the yarns.
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    v Part Buttons

  • When part buttons are pushed in the carriage will ignore any needles that are in the 'B' position. The yarn will pass in front of those needles making a small float for each needle that it ignores.
  • All needles in any other "in work" position will knit in plain stockinette stitch.
  • v Hold Buttons

  • When the hold button is in use the carriage will not knit any needles that are in the 'E' position [D Studio/Singer].
  • v Tension Dial

  • The larger the number the bigger the stitch. This affects the stitch width. Thus a larger number gives you less stitches per inch and a smaller number gives you more stitches per inch or centimeter.
  • v Carriage Release Dial

      CR is the position to turn the dial to when you want the carriage to come off from the bed without having to move the carriage to the end of the bed.

  • KCI engages the patterning belt (the black metal belt that begins to move with the carriage to allow selection of the needles when doing a pattern). KC1 forces the carriage to select the first and last B needle on the main bed out into the D position along with the needles that are part of the pattern.
  • KC When only KC is present on the carriage, then the above functions are performed by a selection under the carriagesee manual for directions.
  • KCII engages the patterning belt (the black metal belt that begins to move with the carriage to allow selection of the needles when doing a pattern). KC2 tells the carriage to select only those needles that are part of the pattern.
  • SM is the Single Motif selector and is used when you want to have your pattern knit only in a certain area of the main bed. It engages the patterning belt and must be used with the needle selector cams.
  • N/L is Normal/Lace and is pretty self-explanatory.
  • WEAVING BRUSH CAST ON

    v Place all the needles you want to use into the 'B' position. Now put every other one into the E position. Put the weaving brushes on the front of the sinker plate into work. (The lever should be up in W/T the brush should be down against the main bed). Carriage on your right. Place the yarn into the 'A' feeder and close the door on the sinker plate, to hold the yarn in place. Take the end of the yarn that comes out of the bottom of the sinker plate in your left hand and put it over the top of the needles (it must be in front of the gate pegs and behind the latches. Slowly move the carriage with your right hand to the left side of the machine. This is a ragged edge cast on and should only be used when it isn't going to be noticed. Great for using when you are going to hang a hem.

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    RAW EDGE CAST ON

    v Place all of the needles that you want to use into the "E" position. Carriage on the right. Take your cast on comb into your left hand with the hooks facing you. Place the cast on comb up against the needle bed so that the hooks are pointing up to the ceiling. Using whatever yarn you want, place it into feeder "A" of the carriage and close the latch to keep it in place. Knit one row to the left, passing the carriage over the cast on comb. If you have the comb tight against the machine and the hooks of it pointing up and pushed up, poking through the needles you will not hurt your machine. Carriage is on the left. Hook the cast on comb onto the stitches that you just knit by giving it a little tug down and forward. Hang weights on the comb and continue knitting. This cast on is great for hanging a hem or turning over and picking it up to make a bottom treatment of some kind.

    CROCHETED CAST ON

    v Bring needles 10 L to 10R into the "E" position. Use a latch tool in your right hand. Hold the yarn in your left hand so that the end is hanging. Place the yarn on the left side of needle 10L. Use the latch tool and grab the yarn underneath needle 10L. Pull the yarn with the hook of the latch tool so that it comes under 10L. Push the latch tool up between needles 10L and 9L. This movement will push the loop that was in the hook of the tool moving it to the back and behind the latch. The hook should be sticking up between 10L and 9L pointing up in the air. Use the hook to catch the yarn that is above 10L and going up to the upper tension mast. Pull the yarn that you just caught in the hook down and through the loop that is behind the latch thus creating a stitch around 10L. Pull the loop down under needle 9L and push the latch tool up between needle 9L and 8L. Push the latch tool up between needles 9L and 8L. Use the hook to catch the yarn that is above 9L and going up to the upper tension mast. Pull the yarn that you just caught i the hook down and through the loop that is behind the latch thus creating a stitch around 9L. Continue this process across the bed. Place your last loop onto the last needle that you want to use. Put the yarn into the "A" feeder of the sinker plate and knit 1 row to the left. You can repeat the entire process at this time if you want to use this for a decorative edge. Just remember that you must do the crocheted edge between the piece that is on the machine already and the bed of the machine if you want to see it on the knitted side of the work.

    HANGING A HEM

    v This is just a method of creating a finished edge or hem on a garment. The primary way of doing this is to use one of the cast on methods described above, knitting some rows and then placing the bottom stitches or "cast on stitches" back up onto the needles that are currently in use on the machine and then continuing to knit. Use the e wrap method above and cast on from 10 left to 10 right. Knit 24 rows. Now look at the stitches on the bottom of this piece of knitting. Place this bottom edge back up onto the needles 10 left to 10 right. You can pick up the whole cast on stitch by picking up both the front and the back strands of the stitch or you can pick up either the back or the front strand. This is personal preference. Just be consistent across your work.

    PICOT HEM

    v Pull out into "E" position the needles that you want to use. Lets say 10 left to 10 right. Push every other one back into the "A" or non-working position so that you are now only working on 10L, 8L, 6L, 4L 2L, 1R, 3R, 5R, 7R, and 9R. E wrap cast on these needles. Knit 10 rows. Pull the remaining "in between needles to the "B" position so that you are now going to work on all needles from 10L to 10R. Knit 12 rows. Hang a hem on every other needle (because that is all you cast on). Continue knitting.

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    LATCH TOOL BIND OFF

    v This is done using a latch tool. It cannot be done on a machine that does not have gate pegs. (See your instruction book). You have knit a piece of fabric say from needle #30 left to #30 right. Make sure the carriage is on the right. Pull all of the needles into the "E" position(D Singer Studio). Take the yarn out of the "A" feeder of the sinker plate so that it goes straight up from the machine bed and fabric to the upper tension unit. **Your left hand should be placed on the needle bed so your thumb is on the butt of the most right needle. In this case it is needle #30 right. Your latch tool should be in your right hand. Hook your latch tool into the hook of needle #30 right. The two hooks are now together. Now using your left thumb which is on the butt of needle # 30 right pull that needle butt back to the back of the machine ("A" position). The hook of the latch tool that is in your right hand should get pulled through the stitch that is on that needle and the stitch should transfer over onto the latch tool. Take your left index finger and place it on the yarn that is going up to the upper tension unit and push the yarn down on the needle bed next to the butt of the most right needle that is in "E" position. In this case it is needle #29 right. Using your right hand and he latch tool in it, grab hold of the yarn with the latch tool and pull the yarn through the stitch that is on the latch tool. The stitch should come off of the tool and a new stitch should be created on the tool (just like crocheting). Notice too that the yarn that created the stitch is wrapped around the gate peg. Place this stitch onto the next needle that is to be bound off. This will be needle #29 right. ** Continue to do this from ** to ** with each stitch until all are bound off.

    STANDARD TENSION SWATCH

    Weaving brush cast on 60 stitches (L30 - R30).  Knit 4 rows. Transfer every other stitch to every other needle = to the tension. If your tension dial is set at 5 then transfer every other stitch to every other needle 5 times. Say stitch 9 left goes on 10 left, 7 left goes on 8 left, 5 left goes on 6 left, 3 left goes on 4 left, and 1 left goes on 2 left. Make sure all the needles that you just made empty are left in the "B" position.

    Knit 4 rows. Move Stitch # L21 to L22 and Stitch # R21 to R22. Leave both of these empty needles out of work. There is then a 40 stitch space between these out of work needles.  Change to a contrast color yarn and Knit 2 rows.

    Set the row counter to 0.  Using whatever pattern you want to Knit 60 rows .  Just remember "WHAT EVER YOU WANT TO DO TO THE SWEATER OR GARMENT YOU MUST DO TO THE SWATCH". So whatever pattern you want to use to knit the sweater you must knit here in the swatch.

    After the 60 rows are complete. Knit 2 rows of contrast color in plain stockinette stitch (no pattern). Knit 4 more rows of plain and bind off.

    Let rest 24 hours. Steam, wash, dry, stretch, whatever you want to be able to do to the sweater now do to the swatch. Once all is complete you can measure the swatch from where needle # 21 was left out of work on one side to where needle # 21 was left out of work on the other. To make it easy just say that the 40 stitches measures 4 inches. Divide 40 stitches by 4 inches and you have 10 stitches per inch.

    Find the first set of 2 rows of contrast yarn. Measure from it to the second set of 2 rows of contrast yarn. In these 60 rows, you knit your preferred pattern. Let's say the 60 rows measure 5 inches. You then divide the 60 rows by the 5 inches and know you have 12 rows per inch.  Once you know your required measurements for the garment you want to knit, it is just a mater of multiplication.

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    Bulky Tension Swatch

    v Weaving brush cast on 30 stitches (L15 R15).

    v Knit 4 rows. Transfer every other stitch to every other needle = to the tension. If your tension dial is set at 5 then transfer every other stitch to every other needle 5 times. Say stitch 9 left goes on 10 left, 7 left goes on 8 left, 5 left goes on 6 left, 3 left goes on 4 left, and 1 left goes on 2 left. Make sure all the needles that you just made empty are left in the "B" position.

    v Knit 4 rows. Move Stitch # L11 to L12 and Stitch # R11 to R12. Leave both of these empty needles out of work. There is then a 20 stitch space between these out of work needles

    v Change to a contrast color yarn and Knit 2 rows.

    v Set the row counter to 0

    v Now using whatever pattern you want to Knit 30 rows

    v Just remember "WHAT EVER YOU WANT TO DO TO THE SWEATER OR GARMENT YOU MUST DO TO THE SWATCH". So whatever pattern you want to use to knit the sweater you must knit here in the swatch.

    v After the 30 rows are complete. Knit 2 rows of contrast color in plain stockinette stitch (no pattern)

    v Knit 4 more rows of plain and bind off.

    v Let rest 24 hours. Steam, wash, dry, stretch, whatever you want to be able to do to the sweater now do to the swatch. Once all is complete you can measure the swatch from where you needle # 11 was left out of work on one side to where needle # 11 was left out of work on the other. To make it easy just say that the 20 stitches measures 4 inches. Divide 20 stitches by 4 inches and you have 5 stitches per inch.

    v Find the first set of 2 rows of contrast yarn. Measure from it to the second set of 2 rows of contrast yarn. It is in these 30 rows that you knit your preferred pattern. For ease let's say the 30 rows measures 5 inches. You then divide the 30 rows by the 5 inches and know you have 6 rows per inch.

    v Once you know your required measurements for the garment you want to knit, it is just a mater of multiplication.

    The machine knitting basics are written to be a help to those who need them. Please don't copy them and hand them out to others with out permission.    The pages are set up so that the phone number should print out at the bottom of each page.  It isn't an act of vanity.  If you have any questions feel free to call me (Lora) at 763-571-8724.  daisyknits@daisyknits.com

     

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